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So He Drove the Man Out, 1982
Oil on paper mounted to board, 47 x 28
Collection of Lynn and Jill Marx

So He Drove the Man Out is the last of several paintings that the artist has done of this event. Through various symbols, he has focused on the mercy and grace of God in the promised Messiah. Adam covers his face while Eve looks back at the appearance of the cherub, whose wings are red, green and violet. The serpent, curled around a dead tree, is colored like the cherub, “for even Satan disguises himself as an angel of light.”

God has mercifully taken the initiative and clothed Adam and Eve in animal skins. He sheds the first blood as a sign to them that “without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness.” The skin still bears the stain of blood and Eve covers their heads with the bloodied skin, symbolic of the Messiah to come, whose blood will make propitiation for sin.

The rocks on the ground stand for Christ, the stumbling stone, for “behold, I lay in Zion a stone of stumbling and a rock of offense, and he who believes in Him will not be disappointed.” The rocky archway through which they are driven is symbolic of Jesus, “the Rock of our salvation,” and our door. He said, “I am the door; if anyone enters through Me he shall be saved.” Jesus alone can bring man back to God. He said, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but through Me.”

The thin band around the cherub’s neck is a sign of God’s promise to mankind. Messiah Jesus, Eve’s seed, shall bruise Satan on the head while being bruised by him on the heel. The colors are symbolic of the incarnation of Jesus. Gold represents the glory He had with the Father “before the world was,” when “He existed in the form of God.” The gold turns into green, a symbol of hope and victory, because Jesus “emptied Himself, taking on the form of a bondservant, and being made in the likeness of men.” Violet, a symbol of humility, surrounds the end offered out to man because Jesus, “being found in appearance as a man, humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.” The red on the end symbolizes the love of God demonstrated toward us “in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” The gold continues around the band to signify that God extends to all who put their trust in Jesus the hope of “eternal glory in Christ.”

So He Drove the Man Out, 1979
Oil on canvas mounted to panel, 47 x 28
Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Rodney Dueck

Adam, 1977
Pencil on paper, 20 x 9
Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Rodney Dueck

Eve, 1977
Pencil and white chalk on blue/gray paper, 14 x 9 5/8
Collection of Rebecca H. Swanson

Eve, 1977
Pencil on paper, 17 x 10
Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Rodney Dueck

 

So He Drove the Man Out, drapery study, 1976
Pencil on paper, 7 3/16 x 6 3/8

This is one of many studies that the artist did for the drapery of the cherub in this painting.

So He Drove the Man Out, drapery study, 1976
Pencil on paper, 7 x 7
Collection of Woody Sparrow

So He Drove the Man Out, drapery study, 1976
Pencil on paper, 7 1/4 x 6 3/8

So He Drove the Man Out, cartoon, 1982
Oil on paper mounted to board, 47 x 28

 



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